What is the Best Cheese Board for a Cheese Snob?
30 July 04

cheese-board-spread-plate.jpg

If visiting a cheese shop is something you often and often do this week, then you must provide your curated food on the best cheese board. Choosing the right cheese plate may mean the difference between picking up an appetizer platter and an exciting party invites guests not to forget quickly. This means not forgetting your best Stilton and Leicester, leaving them unattended on a simple wooden tray. A true cheese flight worth highlighting all the right accessories, such as dried fruit, cookies, jams, and served on sturdy and properly selected cheese plates.


Cheese problem


Cheese has a variety of tastes, shapes, concentrations and colors, and their sources are all over the world. Your choice of cheese can be selected from one animal source (all goats or all goat milk), or it can cross represent different species. A carefully selected cheese board will tell its own story, based entirely on the type of cheese you provide to your guests. An excellent host knows that unless you are hosting a gala dinner for the local Chan Club, a good board will show soft and hard varieties and spicy and gentle choices to satisfy all tastes.


However, we do not need to educate you more, because you are already a cheese overwhelming person, let us begin to choose a suitable service board. There are several variables when deciding on materials, only a few options are available, and you can choose sophisticated mature cheeses. Below we discuss some important points.


board

QQ截图20180509153723.jpg

The most common choice for cheese supply. Reliable, easy to clean and economical, wooden cheeses or plates can be anything from sliced wood to cutting boards. What makes the wood characteristics and how it emphasizes the true difference between cheese stories. For example, supplying a casu marzu (a type of Sardinian sheep cheese) wheel on rustic olive wood slabs in Tuscany will evoke a truly exotic meal and put this famous "worm cheese" on it. On a tattered cutting board with plastic spoons may turn into the stomach of your guests. The presentation is as important as the provenance of the cheese.


In addition to the beauty, the wooden cheese plate can also easily cut the cheese. Round shapes can be cut into wedges, and harder cheeses such as Parmason or Pecorino can be placed in a reasonable place for guests to shave and slice. Speaking of this, you do have a cheese knife and your cheese board to start with, right? Just to name your snobbery needs to be reminded, the following are the key requirements:


Spreader Knife: Soft cheese for cookies or bread

Cheese planes: For hard and semi-hard cheeses such as Pecorino or Parmesan cheese. Doubles server.

Blade: for hard cheese

Wide/flat knife/server: for semi-hard cheese and served after slicing

Fork: Cheese served after cutting

Most knives have two purposes, so you can pinch two or two, but just like your cheese snobbish, you know that using the same utensils for cutting and serving is certainly not acceptable. After all, you don't want your knife to turn into a Brie-Blue-Gruyere-Gouda mystery phone that looks like a crayon.


When selecting a wooden cheese board, it is important to choose a species that does not absorb spices. Naturally, cheese is rich in fats and oils. Once fat is oxidized, it tends to rot. Although this is part of the natural aging process of cheese, most of the “pleasant” cheese aromas are caused by bacteria and yeast during the fermentation of milk. Fatty fat produces the same odor, such as yoghurt, which is sour and often unpleasant.


To avoid this situation, Woods tends to choose oak and most of the softwood (fir, cedar, pine, larch, cypress). In particular, oak is famous for its transfer. Just like a wine barrel, you immediately realize that winemakers use oak because it is easy to absorb and impart fragrance because it is porous.


Therefore, when selecting wood, non-porous tree species are usually best suited to prevent the wood from spreading any undesired aromas. Some of the hardwoods that fall into this category include olive wood, birch, American cherry, hard maple, and teak.


Porous wood includes walnuts and mahogany, so it is best to avoid these species. Please note that although Brazilian walnuts (Ipe), as seen in this paddle, are not affected because Ipe is not a real walnut species.


If you must have one of the woods mentioned above (for example, larch, you can make a beautiful introduction), it is highly recommended to regularly use food safety oils and waxes to season and seal the wood to prevent the spread of flavors and odors.


Finally, when choosing a cheeseboard, it is important to ensure that it does not have any varnish or varnish. Most of these completions are not food-safe, they can be chopped and cut into your food.


Stone and marble slabs


Stone slabs made of marble, granite or natural stone are excellent cheese presentation trays due to their form and function. In particular, the marble slabs provide a beautiful and cool surface for the storage of cheese that does not absorb odors as easily as wood, but the marble is still porous and requires care.


Marble or stone cheese board will provide the best temperature area for your cheese platter. These are dense materials, and their size retains a lot of thermal mass. In English, this means that they can absorb heat faster than other materials and transfer heat away from the cheese, helping them stay cool without melting. For this reason, the vast majority of pastry chefs and confectionery makers use marble in their profession because it prevents the dough from sticking and can quickly and evenly set the chocolate.


So if you plan to participate in an outdoor event or your cheese platter will sit outside on a hot day, you will need to choose marble, granite or stone to preserve the cheese. Better still, a clear dome or get your cheese board to sit in an ice bath beforehand, will get the consent of the fellow cheese heads. Please note that cheese provided at room temperature is correct, so don't over- and ice cubes themselves, because a Frenchman seeing this behavior will immediately pour out all the wine and yak meat. Well, we are children, but the taste of cheese is closely related to the flavor of fermentation and umami. This taste is a bit warm.


As with our CuttingBoard.com, we always want to show that hard stone surfaces and knives do not mix. That is, assuming you are not cutting your cheese with a ceramic knife or silicon steel, you should not be overly concerned that your special cheese knife will become blunt. Only a few hard cheeses require some effort to cut, and for these varieties, usually mandolin or cheese planes are needed.


Although stone and marble seem to be the first choice, maintenance issues still need to be taken care of. Marble is porous, and so is some types of granite, so if you don't take care of it properly, your favorite cheese plate is likely to emit odors. Food-safe sealants or cleaners are highly recommended because most typical sealants are not used to make marbles that do not come in contact with food.


Slate is a relatively new material in the kitchen world, but it has quickly become popular as a server, and... you guessed it, cheeseboard. why? First, kitchen slate is non-porous and does not absorb the taste and smell of the surrounding environment. Unlike marble, which is easily etched (wine, ketchup), slate is less reactive and less susceptible to discoloration.


In other words, slate comes from a large number of species, so not all slate is equal! The colored slate, often from overseas, is porous and easy to peel and chip. Fortunately, the only species we see is tile and home improvement stores. Kitchen slate (slate for food service) is almost always dominated by black slate, not porous, and least likely to flake off.


Non-porous slate is easy to maintain because it does not absorb fat or bacteria on food or cheese


But wait, there is a slate!

QQ截图20180531110450.jpg

Slate is a relatively new material in the kitchen world, but it has quickly become popular as a server, and... you guessed it, cheeseboard. why? First, kitchen slate is non-porous and does not absorb the taste and smell of the surrounding environment. Unlike marble, which is easily etched (wine, ketchup), slate is less reactive and less susceptible to discoloration.


In other words, slate comes from a large number of species, so not all slate is equal! The colored slate, often from overseas, is porous and easy to peel and chip. Fortunately, the only species we see is tile and home improvement stores. Kitchen slate (slate for food service) is almost always dominated by black slate, not porous, and least likely to flake off.


Non-porous slate is easy to maintain because it does not absorb the fat or bacteria in the food or cheese on the surface. A standard rub and scrub is all that is needed, and some food-safe mineral oil dabs will help bring out a nice shiny and glossy slate.


As an added benefit, the pricing of the slate is very reasonable, which makes it attractive and can accumulate a series of slate products for future gatherings. Did we mention that it can also act as a trivet in pinch?


The only disadvantage of slate is that it is easily scratched, so wear and scratches may begin to show up as your more popular cheese board.



It all comes down to proper cleaning


Regardless of the type of cheeseboard you choose, whether it is wood, marble or slate, the only true “secret” for the ultimate cheese snobbery is proper maintenance and maintenance.


After use, scrub your cheese plate with hot soap and water and wipe immediately. The boards should be oiled and waxed, and the marble boards should be sealed monthly. If your cheese plate has even begun to smell, bacteria are already taking up, which means you need to disinfect and disinfect the plate.


You can use the following safe cleaning solutions to remove those nasty bacteria on your circuit board:


Lemon scrub (unpolished marble)

1 tablespoon of Jewish salt


1⁄2 lemon


Cut the lemon in half. Apply mound salt to the affected area. Using the inside of the lemon, rub the salt into the wood and scrub it with a circle. Rinse with warm water after completion and dry immediately.


For polished marble, do not use the above formula (and any commercial solution that uses acidic compounds such as vinegar or lemon juice) as it will etch your marble and remove the polishing agent. Instead, using hydrogen peroxide, this will be a safe on the polished surface. However, if you use black marble, do not use hydrogen peroxide because it may discolor black marble. We know that marble is high maintenance!


Whether you choose stone, glass or wood, the quality cheese board will become a heirloom for the kitchen, showing you the best market choice and retaining its unique taste because of their enviable taste.